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Another “Battlestar Galactica” Reboot?

The original “Battlestar Galactica” series aired in 1978. It was rebooted in 2004 and ran through 2007. I’ll ignore movies like “Razor” and “The Plan”. There are proposals to reboot “Battlestar Galactica” yet again. I asked why we’d have another reboot, and I was met by confusion. What other reboot was there? It was the short run sequel “Galactica 1980”. And it has been forgotten even by fans of the original series.

‘Shoot Them in the Leg’ and Other Idiocies

No, If You Have To Shoot, Shoot Center Mass

The shooting by a police officer of the knife-wielding teenager in Columbus, Ohio has summoned forth the same absurd comments by media and politicians who know nothing about firearms – and their use in adrenaline-filled situations – that we heard from Joe Biden more than once during the campaign: Perhaps the words of wisdom Miyagi gave to Daniel-San should be given unto them: “You… too much TV.”  Since they do watch TV, and presumably the movies shown thereon, perhaps the most famous gunfight in the history of the United States would serve to drive the point home: If you have to shoot, put your target down.

October 26, 1881 – Tombstone, Arizona Territory.  All of the participants in this fight were skilled with the powerful weapons they possessed; i.e. .44 and .45 cal. pistols, a 12 gauge double-barrel shotgun, and  Winchester rifles. Some of the participants had killed men before this fight, and would kill again afterwards. When the fight commenced, the combatants were only about six feet apart in an empty lot next to Fly’s photograph studio. (Some of the “cowboys” had come through the back entrance to the OK Corral nearby, but that is its only connection to the fight.) The shooting lasted only thirty seconds, but in that time about thirty shots were fired. Consider that for a moment – six feet apart, thirty seconds, thirty shots. What were the hits?

An Interview with Author Tony Andarian

Tony Andarian is the author of Sanctum of the Archmage. He published his first novel in 2017 before reworking it and preparing to re-release it, and is developing plans to continue it as an epic fantasy series.   Tamara Wilhite: What led you to rework and release your first novel in the Sanctum of the […]

Real Coffee with Scott Adams: A Review

Nothing about Scott Adams’ daily news and analysis show, Real Coffee with Scott Adams, should work.

Not especially telegenic (said the pot to the kettle), Adams would blend right in at an Upper Midwest accountant’s convention. His lilting voice – something he lost for a number of years – isn’t remarkable, and he is incapable of pronouncing some names. His show features no production value or set design to speak of. Bare wooden home office shelves adorned only with copies of his books form his backdrop.

And yet, once you start listening, it’s hard to stop.

Ken Burns Presents Hemingway as Bull

PBS offered a three part series last week that my husband recorded so that we could sit in bed each night hoping to learn more about Hemingway’s freshwater fishing exploits in Michigan, now that we are living only minutes away from those very same Holy Waters.

After we put the four kiddos to bed, he poured us a glass of Oban Little Bay Scotch (less peat and therefore more to my liking). We got comfy in a mess of bedding and pillows with our two German hunting dogs piled on top like a sundae. We simply don’t have much time to watch TV together and are almost never interested in the same programs. But, “Hemingway,” a new PBS documentary by Ken Burns, was something we had both been anticipating for months.

An Interview with Dr. Michael Rectenwald

Doctor Michael Rectenwald’s most recent book is the dystopian sci-fi novel “Thought Criminal” which I read as part of the Unsafe Space book club. “Thought Criminal” is his first science fiction novel, but it is far from his first book. He’s the author of eleven books including “Google Archipelago: The Digital Gulag and the Simulation of Freedom” and “Beyond Woke”. And I had the pleasure of interviewing him.

Biden’s ‘Major’ Problem: The Challenges and Benefits of Owning a German Shepherd Dog

Behold the samurai of dog breeds!

The Biden family is to be commended for rescuing a shelter dog, but “Major” has been involved in breaking the President’s ankle, and bitten people twice on White House grounds. In some jurisdictions and under certain circumstances, that would mean a death sentence. The Bidens already have a older GSD named Champ that they have had for years, and Joe Biden claims he knows how to train them. It is clear enough, though, that due to his infirmity and/or his schedule he is unable to put what he knows, or thinks he knows, to use in socializing Major.

Book Review: Disarmingly Great

According to Publishers Weekly, somewhere between 1.5 million and 18 quadrillion books are self-published every year. Technology (read: Amazon) has so lowered the publishing bar that anyone with some spare time and a Pinot-fueled hallucination can see their book listed for sale within a day or two. I’ve sampled my fair share. My Kindle library is littered with self-published stories sold at a steep discount – or free – as authors fight for eyeballs and struggle to make a name for themselves.

The overwhelming majority of these are either awful (but not in a satisfying Showgirls way) or forgettable (but not in a compelling Clive Cussler way). If I finish one, it’s out of curiosity and not the result of a compelling narrative. And I never, ever find myself thinking about one of these novels over a year later.

Enter Disarming.

Thoughts and Well-wishes on Passover and Easter

When you write a column scheduled to appear at regular intervals, you face the inevitable challenge of the news cycle rendering the column obsolete, or the due date not corresponding with any scheduled event on which you can build the column.

Fortunately for me, the column you are reading now appears one day before the beginning of Passover, two days prior to Palm Sunday, and a little over a week from the end of Passover and Easter Sunday. That creates the opportunity for some philosophical musings on the significance of the two holidays, which more or less, but not precisely, coincide for reasons grounded in history.

I’ve written before about the relationship of the two holidays, and why their coincidence is not precise. Easter Sunday is always the first Sunday after the first full moon following the Spring Equinox on March 20th or 21st. That’s why it can vary from late March to mid-April. Passover falls in accordance with the Hebrew calendar, which is likewise lunar in its origin, but calculated a bit differently.

The Presumed Rise after the Fall of Civilization

If we fall, we’ll get back up again. If we tear it down, we’ll rebuild, bigger and better. That’s what we tell ourselves. That’s what we believe.

That isn’t necessarily what happens, as the ruined cities and collapsed civilizations scattered around the world demonstrate.

Where does this belief come from? And how does it affect societies, both in the real world and in science fiction?

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