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The Greatest Conservative Films: Blazing Saddles (1974)

Editor’s Note: In April of 2017 writer Eric M. Blake began a series at Western Free Press naming the “Greatest Conservative Films.” The introduction explaining the rules and indexing all films included in the series can be found here. Liberty Island will feature cross-posts of select essays from the series with the aim of encouraging discussion at this cross-roads of cinematic art with political ideology. (Click here to see the original essay. Check out the previously cross-posted entries on Jackie Brown, Captain America: The First AvengerCaptain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil WarUnforgivenHail, Caesar!, Apocalypse Now, Fight Club, Man of Steel, Batman v. Superman: Dawn Of Justice ULTIMATE EDITION, Wonder Woman, Kill BillGran Torino The Dark Knight, and The Dark Knight Rises.) If you would like join this dialogue please contact us at submissions [@] libertyislandmag.com.

The Libertarian Fantasy of ‘Letterkenny’

Deconstructing Canadian Culture, Part 2: “Humour”

In our last post we explored the high-energy, low-stakes, and ultimately aimless retro-gaming netherworld that was Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World and found a lot of art but little matter. So for now we’ll depart the big city of Toronto and take a trip into Canada’s equivalent of flyover country into the little town of Letterkenny.

Now, I should state right up front that making fun of rustics and calling it “Canadian humour” is a trope almost as old as Canada itself, even though I do in fact know that there’s nothing uniquely Canadian about it. Letterkenny is in a tradition dating back to the grand old man of Canadian humour, the Canadian Mark Twain, Stephen Leacock (who I’ll be covering in a later installment).

New Humor Essay: Back in the Saddle

There comes a time in most men’s lives when treatment for erectile dysfunction goes from being some other poor bastard’s problem to something that must be seriously considered. Performance has become less reliable than in youthful glory days, and the underperformance has begun to affect self-esteem and intimate relationships.

Things can be especially confusing if you’ve been out of the loop, i.e. been off the market in those transitory years between steadfast rigidity and a feeling akin to trying to fold a California King foam mattress into the back of a minivan.

‘I don’t feel smart enough right now to be a prophet.’ – Mad Jones…

Check out today’s excerpts from all three volumes of Quin Hillyer’s Accidental Prophet trilogy and buy them on Amazon: Mad Jones, HereticMad Jones, Hero, and Mad Jones, Agonistes

New Fiction: Free Gershwin!

A hilarious short story from the creator of the Bad Road Rising series

Sully was on a Boy Scout camping trip in New Hampshire the first time he heard Rhapsody in Blue. It was after lights out, although the boys continued to giggle and pass a rubber rat from bag to bag. As they dropped off one by one into sleep, music floated in the rustic window from a counselor’s cabin, faint, mysterious, and overwhelming. Sully poked himself with his Boy Scout knife to stay awake for fifteen minutes after the performance, so he could learn the name of the piece.

Sully’s mother swore she’d played Gershwin for him in her womb and that he was born singing but that’s a mother for you. Sully worshipped Gershwin above all others.

‘There are times when he seems to go into weird trances…’

‘… as if his mind isn’t even turned on even though his eyes are wide open. It’s almost like he’s not even there.’

Check out today’s excerpt from the concluding volume of Quin Hillyer’s Accidental Prophet trilogy, Mad Jones, Agonistes, and purchase your copy in paperback or ebook format through Amazon here. You can also purchase the series’ start, Mad Jones, Heretic here in paperback or at a discounted 99 cents in ebook; and Mad Jones, Hero here.

Read the Prologue and First Chapter of Quin Hillyer’s “Mad Jones, Hero”

Pick Up the Second and Third Volumes in The Accidental Prophet Trilogy

In Mad Jones, Heretic, young high school history teacher Madison Lee Jones of Mobile, Alabama, already having lost both parents at a young age, suffers as his grandfather, his wife, his unborn child, and his mother-in-law all die tragically in rapid succession. Grief-stricken and angry, Jones vents by penning 59 religious theses (see appendix) and pinning them to church doors in Mobile and in New Orleans. With his theses unexpectedly (and unintentionally) attracting a national social media following, and spurred on by an odd collection of entrepreneurial friends, Jones—an only intermittently churchgoing Episcopalian—begins a writing and public-speaking “ministry” to elucidate his theme that anger at God can lead to deeper faith. His inaugural public speech/homily, at a Good Friday service at a “charismatic” church in a New Orleans suburb, begins as a fiasco and a comedy of errors—yet somehow ends in triumph, as Jones leaves the church “experiencing a boundless optimism…. He felt that he was leaving a wilderness, and that a Promised Land awaited.”

Click to purchase Mad Jones, Heretic; Mad Jones, Hero; and Mad Jones, Agonistes

PreTeena: July 23 – July 29 2018

Sunday Comics!

You won’t want to miss these hilarious cartoons depicting the ups and downs of adolescence. Now each week’s strips will debut on Sundays as the lead strip of Liberty Island’s Sunday Comics feature. If you draw a comic and would like to have your work featured on Sundays, please contact us: [email protected]

PreTeena: July 16 – July 22 2018

Sunday Comics!

You won’t want to miss these hilarious cartoons depicting the ups and downs of adolescence. Now each week’s strips will debut on Sundays as the lead strip of Liberty Island’s Sunday Comics feature. If you draw a comic and would like to have your work featured on Sundays, please contact us: [email protected]

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