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The Heart of Jesus

Sometimes we need to reframe the way we think about our Savior.

I get people telling me all the time, “You should read such-and-such book.” I don’t always give in when someone recommends a book to me. I’m not opposed to book recommendations, but I know what I like and I’m not going to read something unless it fits within the bounds of what I like. (There’s also a good chance that I’ll forget the book title and never follow up, but that’s a whole different issue for another day.)

Finding Treasures in the Bible

Sometimes the greatest rewards in God’s word are beyond the obvious.

I’ve written before about the blueberries at my mom’s house. My late father transplanted a few blueberry bushes from the North Georgia mountains over 30 years ago, and they’ve thrived ever since.

We get huge, tasty blueberries off these bushes nearly every summer, and other than some pruning and getting rid of briars, we haven’t done much to cultivate them. The berries we pick are better than anything you can find at a store.

The Quality We Miss the Most

We have a severe lack of kindness in our culture today.

In a Facebook group, I saw a young woman ask a question that was elementary. It’s a question that, with just a little research, she could have answered on her own in about five minutes. But she asked the group anyway.

Another woman commented, answering curtly, but following up with something to the effect of, “People ask this question all the time, so all you needed to do was conduct a little research.” The tone of her comment wasn’t followed by “you idiot,” but it might has well have been.

Faith or Moralism?

Is your spiritual life based on genuine faith in God, or are you coasting on believing you’re a good person?

I’m going through the book of Romans with a friend of mine, and the first two chapters offer an interesting contrast. The second half of the first chapter talks about people who wallow in their sins and deny their need for repentance and salvation – and God – while chapter two talks about how religious people need the Gospel too.

The first half of the chapter warns against judging others. This isn’t in the sense that the world claims – that we don’t have the right to call out sin. It’s judgment in the sense of looking down on others whom we don’t perceive as being as “good” as we think we are. It’s an easy human tendency, and not just in religious and moral circles, to give the side-eye to people we deem as less worthy of love and attention as we think we are.

Not My Home

This Independence Day, let’s remember where our real citizenship is.

There’s and old gospel tune called “This World is Not My Home.” The song reminds us as believers that we’re not citizens of this world. In the 80s Lone Justice did a stellar version. Today we’re celebrating the birth of our nation, and Independence Day can be complicated when it falls on a Sunday. As a church staffer who has a hand in service programming, I can see the temptation to go overboard with patriotism. It’s something we’ve done before, as a matter of fact.

The Pitfalls of Emotional Christianity

We’re never meant to live out our faith as a constant chase for emotional highs.

My story of coming to faith in Christ is… well… boring. I grew up in a Christian family, and there was never a time when we weren’t involved in church. When I was seven years old, I decided that I was ready to become a believer in Jesus. It was a simple, logical decision for me – no emotion whatsoever.

My Church Heritage and How It Shaped Me

What studying my non-denominational history taught me

I grew up in church, and I don’t remember any point in my life where my family wasn’t actively involved in a local congregation.

The church I grew up in was a Christian Church. You probably read that last sentence and thought, “well duh!” Aren’t churches Christian by nature? What I mean is that, where some people grew up Baptist, Presbyterian, or Assemblies of God, my quasi-denominal tradition is known as the Christian Church.

What I’ve Learned from Reading a Systematic Theology

Sometimes an in-depth study reveals more about you and others than it does about God.

Last summer, theologian Wayne Grudem announced that he would publish a second edition of his Systematic Theology later in 2020. My Bible study software made it available at a price that was tough to pass up, so I decided to download it and read it “next year.”

4 Reasons I Decided to Launch Liberty Island Books 4.0

A New Era of Publishing Begins for Counterculture Conservatism

There are 4 main reasons why I decided to accept the opportunity to lead Liberty Island, relaunching it in this, its now fourth publishing arrangement…

Dave Chappelle’s All-American Anti-PC Heresies Vs. Ramy Youssef’s Woke-Intersectional-Islamist Cousin-Loving

Check out my new article on Islamist entertainment at The Daily Wire

I had a new article published yesterday at The Daily Wire. I compare and contrast the comedy specials of two American Muslims, and Ramy Youssef, coming down very hard against the latter:

Among the fascinating phenomena of America’s most prominent Muslim activist organizations is how they decide which Muslims to lift up and which to ignore. Compare two recent comedy specials. One, Dave Chappelle’s newest Netflix special “Sticks & Stones,” which is generating intense reactions given its choice of material — including abortion, #MeToo, Transgenderism, “the alphabet people” (referring to the expanding acronym LGBTQIA+), and the implications of the “cancel culture,” which seeks to silence all who do not adhere to the “woke” doctrines of political correctness.

Thinking about this hilariously offensive special brought to mind another recent comedy special that challenged different cultural taboos: Millennial Ramy Youssef’s “Feelings,” released on HBO on June 29.

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