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Read the Prologue and First Chapter of Quin Hillyer’s “Mad Jones, Hero”

Pick Up the Second and Third Volumes in The Accidental Prophet Trilogy

In Mad Jones, Heretic, young high school history teacher Madison Lee Jones of Mobile, Alabama, already having lost both parents at a young age, suffers as his grandfather, his wife, his unborn child, and his mother-in-law all die tragically in rapid succession. Grief-stricken and angry, Jones vents by penning 59 religious theses (see appendix) and pinning them to church doors in Mobile and in New Orleans. With his theses unexpectedly (and unintentionally) attracting a national social media following, and spurred on by an odd collection of entrepreneurial friends, Jones—an only intermittently churchgoing Episcopalian—begins a writing and public-speaking “ministry” to elucidate his theme that anger at God can lead to deeper faith. His inaugural public speech/homily, at a Good Friday service at a “charismatic” church in a New Orleans suburb, begins as a fiasco and a comedy of errors—yet somehow ends in triumph, as Jones leaves the church “experiencing a boundless optimism…. He felt that he was leaving a wilderness, and that a Promised Land awaited.”

Click to purchase Mad Jones, Heretic; Mad Jones, Hero; and Mad Jones, Agonistes

New Poetry: Daydreaming

Standing on the corner of the road,

Watching the sky change from black to red,

Thinking of all the day demands.

 

Hungover from the night before.

 

How am I alive?

New Fiction: Red Sunset

This Is Not a Beach Book, Part V

       The name of the movie was Red Sunset. It was an anti-communist film, and Heather Paige was playing the mother of a soldier. They were filming in D.C. and Los Angeles in the fall for a release in 1986.

       And Heather Paige wanted me and my friends to go see it. That’s how we could help America win the Cold War against the Russians. “If a lot of people see it, it can help in the effort,” she said.

       “That won’t be a problem,” I said. “My family owns a movie theater.”

Characterization 101: Characterizing Through Dialog

Part 8 In a Weekly Column With Advice for Conservative Creative Writers

Welcome to this series on how to write fiction from a conservative point of view. These posts can simply be read, or you are invited to join a guided writer’s workshop to practice and critique with other writers. To join the workshop, please email me, Jamie, at kywrite at gmail.com and request an invitation.

PreTeena: July 30 – August 5, 2018

Sunday Comics!

You won’t want to miss these hilarious cartoons depicting the ups and downs of adolescence. Now each week’s strips will debut on Sundays as the lead strip of Liberty Island’s Sunday Comics feature. If you draw a comic and would like to have your work featured on Sundays, please contact us: [email protected] Check out Allison Barrows’ new PreTeena blog here.

The Paper of Record Just Recorded They’re All Right with Racism. Really

Or: “The black people were surprisingly good last night…”

One of my personal failings (well, the only one I feel like admitting) is I have a strong fairness impulse. It was the whole thing, judge people by the content of the character not the color of the skin. My father, who had grown up in the deep South, surrounded by virulent racism, introduced me to the concept, mostly by living it. It was what made me a nascent liberal as a young man.

That belief in fairness was the same thing that drove me away from Liberals. Growing up, my experiences with other kids growing up were a lot like the Woody Allen joke about going to youth camp “…where I was sadistically beaten by children of all colors and creeds.”

Those experiences made it clear to me that “jerk” was a choice limited to any race, sex, or religion. And thus I was rather heretical toward the idea that People of Color were really Saints of Color.

One Happy Doggo Loves the Beach: 4 Photos

Pics from Rosie’s Dog Beach in Long Beach from February 2015

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

Who Will Be Left Behind after the Singularity

A heated discussion raged about when the Singularity would arrive. The believers were quite convinced it was the technological equivalent of the Rapture in Christianity. Someone asked who would take care of all the servers after everyone was gone. Another replied that the computers would take care of themselves at that point. I thought it was hilarious and added that the Amish would not join a Singularity, though they wouldn’t be taking care of server farms hosting uploaded personalities, either. That exchange is what led to my short story “A Post-Singularity Story”.

Who would be left behind as a Singularity arrives, as some choose to upload their minds to “digital heaven,” likely leaving their bodies behind?

The Greatest Conservative Films: Apocalypse Now (1979/2001)

Editor’s Note: In April of 2017 writer Eric M. Blake began a series at Western Free Press naming the “Greatest Conservative Films.” The introduction explaining the rules and indexing all films included in the series can be found here. Liberty Island will feature cross-posts of select essays from the series with the aim of encouraging discussion at this cross-roads of cinematic art with political ideology. (Click here to see the original essay. Check out the previously cross-posted entries on Jackie Brown, Captain America: The First AvengerCaptain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil WarUnforgiven, and Hail, Caesar!) If you would like join this dialogue please contact us at submissions [@] libertyislandmag.com.

Deplora Boule brings the Savage, Swiftian Satire to the “News”

Narrating the Narrative

On one level, it’s the story of a fairly nice young girl, largely ignored by her mother and estranged from her father, who goes off to college, falls into the clutches of a cult, and proceeds to wreck her life, along with the lives of the few people who really cared for her.

On another level, it’s the bitterly funny story of the way the deeply-deluded and stultifyingly self-important people who should be “reporting” the news take it upon themselves to “make” the news. Or, as the title of the novel suggests, they craft “The Narrative.” Google Dan Rather and “JournoList” for some of the egregious examples that are known to the discerning citizens, to say nothing of the DNC email dump that revealed allegedly objective journalists coordinating and clearing their stories with the campaign of the presumptive next President of the Vagina States of America.

With such a wealth of deserving targets, in less-skilled (or courageous) hands such a novel might be a thunderingly dull polemic –– and Lord knows, there are enough of those around –– but this is both outrageous and wickedly funny.   I say again, The Narrative is wickedly funny, teeing up the self-deceptions of the Woke Warriors of Journalism.

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