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Custer’s Unpublished Letters vs. Woke America

One of the pleasures of working for a venerable publishing house with an attic full of musty files is digging through long forgotten correspondence. A few years ago, I was engaged in just such an endeavor and came upon a bit of historical gold.

A Bonfire of Reason

A third of the way into Tom Wolfe’s classic novel of the 1980’s, The Bonfire of the Vanities, a darkly comedic scene unfolds around Assistant District Attorney Larry Kramer shortly after he starts investigating the case of Henry Lamb, a teenager who was the apparent victim of a hit-and-run.

Star Trek Vs Stargate

Aliens, interstellar adventures, and existential threats to the universe as we know it. While this may sound like a description of Star Trek, Stargate shares a number of themes at a variety of levels. Let’s look at a few of those as well as the differences between the two.

What Remains of The Remains of the Day?

I can see myself, standing in a local video rental store, circa 1995, holding a hard plastic covered copy of  and thinking, “How badly do I want to see this movie?”

Catching Up with Author Jon Del Arroz

I initially interviewed Jon Del Arroz after his novel Justified: The Saga of the Nano Templar book came out. (It is now part of a series.) He is a prolific author. He’s published steampunk novels like For Steam and Country and science fiction works like The Stars Entwined. That’s why I thought it was necessary to catch up with him on his latest projects.

 

Another “Battlestar Galactica” Reboot?

The original “Battlestar Galactica” series aired in 1978. It was rebooted in 2004 and ran through 2007. I’ll ignore movies like “Razor” and “The Plan”. There are proposals to reboot “Battlestar Galactica” yet again. I asked why we’d have another reboot, and I was met by confusion. What other reboot was there? It was the short run sequel “Galactica 1980”. And it has been forgotten even by fans of the original series.

‘Shoot Them in the Leg’ and Other Idiocies

No, If You Have To Shoot, Shoot Center Mass

The shooting by a police officer of the knife-wielding teenager in Columbus, Ohio has summoned forth the same absurd comments by media and politicians who know nothing about firearms – and their use in adrenaline-filled situations – that we heard from Joe Biden more than once during the campaign: Perhaps the words of wisdom Miyagi gave to Daniel-San should be given unto them: “You… too much TV.”  Since they do watch TV, and presumably the movies shown thereon, perhaps the most famous gunfight in the history of the United States would serve to drive the point home: If you have to shoot, put your target down.

October 26, 1881 – Tombstone, Arizona Territory.  All of the participants in this fight were skilled with the powerful weapons they possessed; i.e. .44 and .45 cal. pistols, a 12 gauge double-barrel shotgun, and  Winchester rifles. Some of the participants had killed men before this fight, and would kill again afterwards. When the fight commenced, the combatants were only about six feet apart in an empty lot next to Fly’s photograph studio. (Some of the “cowboys” had come through the back entrance to the OK Corral nearby, but that is its only connection to the fight.) The shooting lasted only thirty seconds, but in that time about thirty shots were fired. Consider that for a moment – six feet apart, thirty seconds, thirty shots. What were the hits?

An Interview with Author Tony Andarian

Tony Andarian is the author of Sanctum of the Archmage. He published his first novel in 2017 before reworking it and preparing to re-release it, and is developing plans to continue it as an epic fantasy series.   Tamara Wilhite: What led you to rework and release your first novel in the Sanctum of the […]

Real Coffee with Scott Adams: A Review

Nothing about Scott Adams’ daily news and analysis show, Real Coffee with Scott Adams, should work.

Not especially telegenic (said the pot to the kettle), Adams would blend right in at an Upper Midwest accountant’s convention. His lilting voice – something he lost for a number of years – isn’t remarkable, and he is incapable of pronouncing some names. His show features no production value or set design to speak of. Bare wooden home office shelves adorned only with copies of his books form his backdrop.

And yet, once you start listening, it’s hard to stop.

Ken Burns Presents Hemingway as Bull

PBS offered a three part series last week that my husband recorded so that we could sit in bed each night hoping to learn more about Hemingway’s freshwater fishing exploits in Michigan, now that we are living only minutes away from those very same Holy Waters.

After we put the four kiddos to bed, he poured us a glass of Oban Little Bay Scotch (less peat and therefore more to my liking). We got comfy in a mess of bedding and pillows with our two German hunting dogs piled on top like a sundae. We simply don’t have much time to watch TV together and are almost never interested in the same programs. But, “Hemingway,” a new PBS documentary by Ken Burns, was something we had both been anticipating for months.

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