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Alec Ott

Alec Ott’s professional life spans over 20 years with writing experience in marketing literature, proposals, technical manuals, legal documents and creative works. He studied English Literature at the University of Maryland and has degrees in English, Business Administration and Law. Alec lives in Northern Kentucky with his wife, Marygrace, and six children along with several pet rabbits and a cat.

His creative work includes:

Novels
Perdicion: The Other Blue Planet (to be published in November 2017)
Perdicion: Evil Under the Yellow Planet (in progress)
Perdicion: Secrets of the Red Planet (in progress)

Short Stories
The Natural Contract (2016)
The Healing
The Decent

Comparing Mary with Fantasy Characters

The Blessed Mother’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, Part 3

About a year and a half ago, I wrote the article The Logos: A Perfect Man’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, in which I compared the character of Jesus Christ with popular characters in fantasy and science fiction, such as Star Trek, Star Wars, select superheroes and The Lord of the Rings. My conclusion was that if he was considered merely as a literary figure, even in that limited sense, Jesus is a singular character in all of history, one that beats all other heroes at their own game. That is because he is portrayed as the Logos himself, a being incapable of making mistakes—but even more so—the model of perfection itself with unlimited, infinite power. No other figure comes even close—because, as I posited, it’s hard for mere humans to even grasp the existence of someone like that.

I now return with another comparable character, and one who is considered to be the greatest creature of all of God’s creation. Only the Logos, who is God and not a creature, is greater. And he is her son.

Comparing Mary with Characters in Star Trek and Star Wars

The Blessed Mother’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, Part 2

About a year and a half ago, I wrote the article The Logos: A Perfect Man’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, in which I compared the character of Jesus Christ with popular characters in fantasy and science fiction, such as Star Trek, Star Wars, select superheroes and The Lord of the Rings. My conclusion was that if he was considered merely as a literary figure, even in that limited sense, Jesus is a singular character in all of history, one that beats all other heroes at their own game. That is because he is portrayed as the Logos himself, a being incapable of making mistakes—but even more so—the model of perfection itself with unlimited, infinite power. No other figure comes even close—because, as I posited, it’s hard for mere humans to even grasp the existence of someone like that.

I now return with another comparable character, and one who is considered to be the greatest creature of all of God’s creation. Only the Logos, who is God and not a creature, is greater. And he is her son.

The Blessed Mother’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, Part 1

About a year and a half ago, I wrote the article The Logos: A Perfect Man’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, in which I compared the character of Jesus Christ with popular characters in fantasy and science fiction, such as Star Trek, Star Wars, select superheroes and The Lord of the Rings. My conclusion was that if he was considered merely as a literary figure, even in that limited sense, Jesus is a singular character in all of history, one that beats all other heroes at their own game. That is because he is portrayed as the Logos himself, a being incapable of making mistakes—but even more so—the model of perfection itself with unlimited, infinite power. No other figure comes even close—because, as I posited, it’s hard for mere humans to even grasp the existence of someone like that.

I now return with another comparable character, and one who is considered to be the greatest creature of all of God’s creation. Only the Logos, who is God and not a creature, is greater. And he is her son.

Why God Does Not Want You To Worry About Anything…

The Andrew Klavan Symposium, Part 7

Five Liberty Island writers – Fred Tribuzzo, Alec Ott, Jon Bishop, Chris Queen, and David M. Swindle — explore the insights from the memoir of one of their favorite novelists

New Fiction: The Decent

When a Trump Supporter And a Progressive Go On Their First Date…

Gary showed up right at 5:25, coatless and tieless, trying his best to match Gina’s more casual khakis and polo shirt. They did start out in the coffee shop, Gina ordering them two decaffeinated lattes. (Wanda eyed her wryly, shaking her head.) After about an hour, he invited her to dinner at a local seafood bar that was appropriately causal. She agreed. And as it was a warm late Spring evening they walked the three blocks together.

A Search For An Authentic Life

The Andrew Klavan Symposium, Part 2

Five Liberty Island writers – Fred Tribuzzo, Alec Ott, Jon Bishop, Chris Queen, and David M. Swindle — explore the insights from the memoir of one of their favorite novelists

New Fiction: The Healing

The realization hit Jim like a boxing glove. “Terry,” he said, tears now flowing in his eyes. He pulled her to him and hugged her with all his might. “I’m so, so sorry!” After a few moments, he pulled back and looked into her eyes again. “The fear, the hopelessness, of being unloved! I can’t imagine how that felt!”

The Logos: A Perfect Man’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy

Imagine meeting the perfect man. He’s a physical man in that he exists and interacts in this material world just like the rest of us. He was born and grew up, he eats, he sleeps, and he can die. But he’s also perfectly aligned with the divine. He has superhuman abilities and never ever makes a mistake. Everything he does and says has a great meaning behind it.

Humanity has grappled with the possibility of this man from the beginning of knowledge. Ancient Western philosophy called such a man the “Logos” or “Universal Wise Man.” The English Common Law system, on a more practical level, refers to the “reasonable, prudent man,” who is applied as the measure to determine if a particular defendant’s actions compare. Would the reasonable, prudent man have driven the car with bald tires? Not even a possibility.

Literature and culture have provided many great figures who could be considered as types to the Logos. Many appear in the Bible, of course. The Old Testament has several great figures, for sure, including Moses and the Prophet Elijah. Moses serves as a close example as the wise lawgiver who performs great miracles. Sampson, another lesser example, is a man whose strength is superhuman, but whose lustful vices are his undoing. Yet all fall short of the ideal and make no claims to be the Logos himself.