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Audie Cockings

A practicing Gerontologist, happy wife, and mama of four. I play competitive volleyball for fun and exercise and I amuse myself and a modest handful of others with narratives of brainy but thoroughly flawed women and the men who love them. Part heavily embellished almost truths/could-have-beens and part fiction, my characters and stories are loosely based on folks I've met in places I've been...

Interests include living artists, music (everything from 80's rap to Trevor Jones compositions), and foreign films on Netflix (particularly WWII era non-fiction). I LOVE cooking, hiking, and parking my butt in a beach chair at any available body of water.

I believe that curve balls are often blessings in disguise and I'm unapologetic in my support for our military, having been the lucky gal of an Army Ranger.

When we're not at home in Maryland, we're off the grid in Northern Michigan or eating soft-shell lobsta in my newest favorite state, Maine.

My debut novel, "Little Red Rider" (thriller/mystery), was published in 2014. It can easily be found at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Greetings and Readings, an indie bookseller in Baltimore. My second and third novels are currently in the editing stage. They are entitled "The Mole" and "A Girl, A Dog, A Boat".

The Mole is the second of three novels in the Little Red Rider series, a tale of a widowed housewife who's politically charged dreams tell the future before it happens. She uses her dreams to keep her son, a newly minted army ranger, out of danger with the help of her late husband's best friend, a general at the Pentagon.

A Girl, A Dog, A Boat is a women's fiction novel about a medical student who gets pregnant and dumped in the same week. Broke and broken, Ruby figures that a rickety live-aboard is the only way she afford to stay in Annapolis. But the only boat in her price range is located in Maine, a decommissioned lobster boat owned by Jamie, a red-headed hot-tempered retired lobsterman who isn't willing to sell "Deanna Marie" to some stuck up, silly young woman "from away" who can't even drive a car.

There Is a Free Lunch After All…

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

4 Photos From an Afternoon at Popham Beach, Phippsburg, Maine

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

Fishing for Lake Trout off the Old Mission Peninsula, Traverse City, Michigan

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

Sunset On A Pristine Northern Michigan Farm

*Submit your photographs (or videos) of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

Baby razor clams

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

Why Child Sacrifice Is Easy to Imagine

Yesterday I read a shocking article by National Geographic detailing the methodical sacrificial killing of 140 children ages five to fourteen. The broken child remains were recently discovered and unearthed near Chan Chan, an archeological complex in coastal Peru. The event is estimated to be five hundred years old.

Young ones were donated by parents to be held down, sternums severed in half, and rib cages broken open so that the undersized hearts could be cut out of the bodies.  The article does not state whether the children were still alive during that procedure, but that all were killed at the same time –which tells me that there were at least 140 community members who systematically killed at once. The researchers also mentioned that there were few “false starts” in the cutting, indicating that ritual members were skilled with the procedure and ceremonial blades.

Downeast, Maine in April

Saturday Nature Photography

Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.

The Gun Debate: The Math Doesn’t Work…

A Reflection on How Far We’ve Come In 50 Years

Seeing children tout their parent’s feelings on all things political is sad to me. And yet, there are students nearby, outdoors, passionately picketing against those who most fiercely protect the free speech they are exercising.

An eleven-year-old at Maryland’s Takoma Park Middle School is holding a sign stating, “GOP Math–Guns + More Guns = Less Gun Violence”.  Pretty sarcastically insightful for a sixth grader, right?

Netflix Holiday Movie Pick: Joyeux Noel (Merry Christmas)

Boots on the Ground Diplomacy

As French, Scottish and German soldiers prepare to open their presents on Christmas Eve 1914, a monumentous event occurs that changes the destinies of four people: An Anglican priest, a French lieutenant, a world-class tenor and his soprano lover. A heartwarming WWI era tale inspired by a true story.

The President Just Stole Your Land… and Gave it Back to Utah

Patagonia sent me, a devout patron, not one but two emails this week in defense of our federal public lands.  And today’s was just blatant misinformation if not an outright scathing lie.  Either way, it seems that Patagonia Inc. has officially tossed their 50 SPF hat into the fiery ring of environmental escamotage.

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