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David Churchill Barrow

David Churchill Barrow is a Massachusetts “Swamp Yankee” descendant of William Bradford and Myles Standish of Pilgrim fame, who grew up on a farm that has not been sold since first built in the early 1700s.  In that farmhouse still hangs the commission of James Churchill as a captain in the Massachusetts militia signed by John Hancock, and the sword of Thomas Churchill, a Navy engineer who served in the Blockade of the Confederacy.  David’s father, David Bradford Barrow, was a Marine gentleman farmer who commanded a flame-thrower tank in the Battle of Saipan in WW II.

David’s childhood was mostly spent in the woods and swamps of Southeast Massachusetts, building forts and pretending to be Daniel Boone, the Little Drummer Boy of Shiloh, or just an unnamed “Minuteman” making ready to “fire the shot heard round the world.”  He has lived and breathed history since first opening his eyes.

He met his wife MaryLu in high school.  They were married in 1979 and have three adult children.  MaryLu is a former elementary school teacher working on her first children’s book.  Today they live just outside Tampa, Florida, with their Berger Blanc Suisse Attila and their two cats, Minnie and Tink.

David has written non-fiction historical pieces and columns for The Tampa Tribune (now the Tampa Bay Times), The Marine Corps Gazette and the “Lore of the Corps” section of The Marine Corps Times.  He has been a regular contributor of both short stories and posts to Liberty Island Magazine since its inception.  He and MaryLu co-authored Silver and Lead and are working together on a YA novel centered around the so-called “Boston Massacre.”

Read this Free Chapter from Silver & Lead: A Novella of the West

Download Silver & Lead: A Novella of the West by David Churchill Barrow and MaryLu Barrow on Amazon for 99 cents!

New Historical Fiction: A Hero’s Inspiration

Young Christopher worshiped a superhero.  There was no help for it; the spirit of the man was in the very air he breathed in Boone’s Lick, Missouri – the final stop for that famous family. Christopher’s own family lived on land purchased from the Boones and had intermarried with them. He would sit wide-eyed by the fire as the men told stories, sometimes repeatedly, of the exploits of Daniel Boone.

He was told how Dan’l got his first rifle at the age of twelve; and how he promptly shot a panther through the heart in mid-air as it pounced, while his young companions ran for their lives. Christopher knew that Daniel Boone was the first to lead the pioneers on the Wilderness Road through the Cumberland gap to the Ken Tuc Ky – the “dark bloody ground” where tribes from all points of the compass met to settle their differences in battle. He thought how foolish it was for that Shawnee war party to kidnap those Boonesborough girls foraging outside the settlement. Did they not know one of them was Jemima Boone? It took but two days for her father and some friends to track them down, surprise them as they ate – kill some, scatter the rest, and bring Jemima and the other two girls home safe and unharmed.

M21: The Greatest Wolf Pack Leader Ever Known

Along with his mate F42, with whom he shared authority, M21 presided over the Halcyon days of the monitored Yellowstone wolf pack known as the Druids. He died peacefully of natural causes under a tree of his own choosing; undefeated in battle yet never having killed an opponent.

A Thanksgiving Salute

November brings the confluence of three anniversaries – the birthday of the United States Marine Corps on November 10, Veteran’s Day on November 11, and of course, Thanksgiving. There was a passenger onboard the Mayflower who could be honored upon all three. He was a soldier of fortune who, in between wars, took pity upon these hapless farmers and artisans we call Pilgrims – who were armed with faith but little else – and agreed to accompany them to the new world as military advisor. He was the only one who did not get sick that first brutal winter (half of them died, including his wife, Rose) and so he tended to all the others, especially William Bradford, who would soon serve as governor for most of the remainder of his life and become his life-long friend. The calm, thoughtful Bradford and this fiery-tempered soldier formed a partnership that not only allowed New Plymouth to survive, but eventually thrive. That soldier’s name was Myles Standish.

New Fiction: The Last Pistoleer

Rancho de San Miguelito, Chihuahua, Mexico – May 14, 1916 – High Noon:  “HALT!” yelled the young cavalry lieutenant, as the threehorsemen riding out of the gated archway veered away from the men he had posted on the southeast side of the hacienda and headed at full-gallop towards him. They had apparently been alerted to make their escape by the man skinning a dead cow in the yard that had run into the ranch house as the soldiers approached, and then came back out again, nonchalantly resuming his work.

“Damnit!” The lieutenant dropped the Springfield rifle he held in his left hand – useless with three riders less than twenty yards away and closing fast – and drew the Colt “Peacemaker” he’d picked up on order in El Paso just before deploying south of the border.

At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, 1918, the guns fell silent…

A Veteran’s Day Reflection

We now call it Veteran’s Day, because to continue to refer to it as “Armistice Day” would seem like a cruel joke, given subsequent events. It was billed as “the war to end wars” and “the war to make the world safe for democracy.” Naive idealism ran so high that even 10 years after the war the Kellogg-Briand Pact was signed, purporting to end war as a dispute resolution among nations (and although historians tend to smirk at its mention, it was the beginning of our undue reliance upon weak international forums rather than time-tested deterrence).

‘It is the eternal curse of guys who have pretty wives or girlfriends…’

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

“Do you hear the grasshopper that is at your feet?”

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

New Fiction: THE GOAT

Lee’s battle plan on the morning of the third day had a lot of moving pieces. Timing would be a factor too, but the Army of Northern Virginia had pulled off such complexities many times in the last two years – against worst odds – and had never failed.

Longstreet didn’t like it…. Didn’t like it at all. “I can safely say there never was a body of fifteen thousand men who could make that attack successfully,” he had warned, but Longstreet was either unaware of, or discounted, Lee’s secret ingredient.

Growing Up In An Instant

Check out this excerpt from Silver & Lead: A Novella of the West by David Churchill Barrow and MaryLu Barrow.

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