Login Register Our Team Submission Guidelines Contact FAQs Terms of Use

Making Gotham Great Again, Part 2: Law and Order

Considering Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns as a Mirror to Today’s Politics

In an interview with Comic Book Confidential in 1988, Frank Miller remarked that 1980s America was a “very frightening, silly place… it’s often silly and frightening at the same time and [he] hope[d] [The Dark Knight Returns] is silly and frightening at the same time.”

Editor’s Note: Click here for Part 1 of this ongoing series. Warning: spoilers in this and the previous installment.

You do not have to read very far in The Dark Knight Returns to realize that Miller can indeed illicit horror and laughs on the same page, if not in the same panel. Miller’s genius at combining these two seemingly contradictory responses lead to some intriguing commentary on criminality and society’s response to it. And like Miller’s satirical attacks on the media, his observations on modern America’s inability to seriously deal with crime make interesting parallels with the Trump era.

The Fable of Sarah and the Little Red Hen

Or Peddling Chickenshit and Claiming It’s Chicken Salad

Once upon a time a lady named Sarah wanted to go out to dinner. She decided to eat at the Little Red Hen’s restaurant. The Little Red Hen was staffed by the better, kinder, smarter sort of people who knew that Sarah was in league with Satan, and they told Sarah they didn’t want her to eat at their restaurant. Sarah quietly left.

The End

Faith In Our Fathers

The FBI and Journalists’ Collusion to Throw the Election Will Corrode America’s Soul

One of the best books you haven’t read is called Flags of our Fathers. Written by James Bradley, the son of Corpsman John Bradley, one of the six men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima, it is a gripping recounting of the little known fates and history of the men on Mount Suribachi in that most iconic of photographs.

As a boy, young James knew that his father was famous and respected in their little town for something, but since his father would neither talk about the mysterious event and even trained his children to deflect the telephone calls that continually came in asking for interviews, it was not until his father died that the boy learned his father was famous.